Is magic an illusion?

Is magic an illusion?

What does the Bible say? (Hint: we get there later in the article.)


In case you’re too short on time here is a link to a page with all of the facts from the Bible about magic—from creation through the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem. So, I’ve written a brief explanation about why this question is so relevant to the modern problem of magic: Magic, according to the Bible, is something that someone else is creating for a purpose, but it has no real value or purpose. That’s because magical beliefs are a way to avoid taking responsibility for one’s actions and thereby allowing God to have a say. In this sense, I want to say that the Christian solution to the problem of magic is exactly that: a non-confrontational, secular, secular religion where the truth is what’s not in the Bible.

One final point. It is very possible that there are atheists who are believers, and perhaps some atheists who are believers, but it’s also possible that they don’t believe in a god, and therefore could possibly believe in magic. If there is one thing atheism has taught me, it is that I am not one of those. I’m not a religious person—that’s not my job. My job is to try to understand science and reason, and look at evidence for and against and try to form my own conclusion based on that evidence. If I found evidence that a supernatural god created the universe and it’s just the same today as it was five billion years ago, that is my right. That is my right that comes from science. But when I find evidence from science or from reason that the universe is only about 4 billion years old, as some atheists argue, that’s not what that evidence says. It says it was created a lot earlier than that. And that’s what a believer would say, in a similar situation. I will therefore take that as my right as a non-believer. If we don’t like that, and find evidence that the universe was created a long, long time ago, that’s fine. A person should not be forced to take those kinds of views.

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It is worth noting that I can make a similar point about non-religious beliefs. The reason isn’t just because I think it’s unfair—I mean, some atheists will agree with me—but that for the most part, non-religious people are not held in such a way that they cannot think for themselves and that religion—if it is an appropriate