When was the word witch first used?

When was the word witch first used?

The English word witch is usually derived from the Middle English word “wite”, which meant a little man who did strange things. However, this is a somewhat misleading explanation. The original meaning was to cast a spell upon a person or thing. A wretch was a mischievous person, whereas a witch was often a wicked person. Wittenberg (1300s)

The word “witching” first appeared in the Middle English text of St. Cuthbert’s The Book of Wort (1308). In the 13th century, the words for witchcraft and the word “witch” were in use as synonyms at least for those of different types. “The original meaning of the word was to cast a spell upon a person or thing.” [1]

Although the “original meaning” of the word “witch” was probably correct and it was always used in a disparaging way, the word “witch” was not always so offensive. The word “witch” was often used in a more positive way to refer to a very beautiful woman, to a kind neighbor, or to a virtuous person. The earliest documented use of this meaning of “witch” (1500s) was in the form “witan”, which meant “witch.” Witchcraft and Satanism: The Early History

An earlier sense of “witch” was used also in the sense of a mischievous person. The first known use of this meaning in English was a 13th century English book that was written in English, but was not written in the original language as it was translated into French and other English words. In the 13th century the term “witan” was used as a synonym for “witch” to mean “a mischievous person.” In the early 15th century King Henry VIII changed the meaning of the word “witch” from a mischievous person to a wicked person or person of “the Devil”. This change was probably caused by various factors, including the idea that a person acting contrary to the wishes of his/her queen is wicked. In any case, the word “witan”, which was translated “witch” in England, became a synonym for “devil”, and was used as such throughout much of Europe. Thus in 1516 “witan” was used, in German, to mean “a deranged person,” to mean a male “witch” who practices necromancy, in Spanish it was used as in English, in Italian it became a syn